Rokusaburo Michiba Soup Diet

How to Lose 15-20 Pounds by Eating Soup

Rating: 5 / 5 ( 176985)

Weight Loss Soups

Rokusaburo Michiba Soup Diet Fat Burning Soup Diet Before And After Photos

How to cook like an Iron Chef

Iron Chefs Rokusaburo Michiba, Kenichi Chen, Hiroyuki Sakai and Masahiko Kobe reunited in Sydney over the weekend, cooking side by side at the Sydney Opera House to raise funds for Opportunity International Australia. It was their first on stage reunion in almost 20 years, after Iron Chef, one of the most popular TV cooking series in the world, finished in Japan.

They were joined by Michelin star chef Kentaro Chen from Shisen Hanten and Asia’s Top Pastry Chef Janice Wong from 2am Dessert Bar / Cobo House. Although this occasion is special for everyone involved, it is even more so so for the oldest Iron Chef, Michiba, who turns 87 soon. This was the first time Michiba cooked in Australia and could well be the last time he cooks outside Japan. We spoke to the four as they prepared for last weekend's big event.

Original four Iron Chefs, Kentaro Chen, Janice Wong at the booth of the charity Opportunity International Australia

Japanese cuisine chef Rokusaburo Michiba

Iron Chef Japanese Michiba

This is apparently the last ever time you will cook outside Japan. What are you making?

I brought Japanese bowls from Japan for the dinner. They come with a lid. I like them because not only do they play an important part in Japanese cuisine but they also give guests a nice aroma and a bit of surprise ‘wow’ element when they open the lid. For my dish, I will create a one-bowl appetiser dish, using seven Australian local ingredients and mixing them with Japanese miso. I would call this ‘the world’s first wan-mori –zensai (appetiser served in a Japanese bowl)’.

Everything I had in Sydney is delicious. I keep thinking, what I can do to satisfy Australian guests who have a discriminating palate? I would like to use Australian ingredients and Japanese fermented food, which is very important in Japanese cuisine, such as miso, soy sauce and sake, to create a joint dish between Australia and Japan.

What is your secret weapon in the kitchen?

Actually, for me, cheese is a special ingredient. Maybe I was the first one to start using cheese for miso soups, like, 30 or 40 years ago. Cheese and miso are both fermented food so they go well with each other.

How has life changed for you after Iron Chef?

When I started on the show, I was 63 years old. Being on the show was big publicity without a doubt and that made me and my restaurant more well-known. Even after 20 years, people recognise me on the street. I have lots of fans and most of them are older ladies. Seeing how happy they are to see me makes me humble and thankful. Being on the show was a great experience for me and I am so grateful for the opportunity and support I have got.

Italian cuisine chef Masahiko Kobe

"Italian" Iron Chef Masahiko Kobe

What is your secret weapon in the kitchen?

My passion, definitely. I think caring for both your guests and food ingredients sincerely and trying to cook better each time is important. If you have good ingredients, almost anyone can cook a delicious dish. But the difference between an ordinary cook and us is whether you have that passion or not. Only chefs with the passion can make the most of each ingredient and even reveal the hidden potential of it.

You are known as the 'Prince of Pasta'. What's the most interesting pasta you have created on Iron Chef?

The most unforgettable one is the Torofie (a short, thin, twisted pasta) I made from scratch for my first face-off on Iron Chef. I blended chocolate into the dough and made black Torofie. I was so nervous and blanked out that I made black pasta.

In Sydney, I can’t make the black Torofie as we don’t have enough time to prepare it for 250 guests but instead, I would like to make pasta which has some elements of my home prefecture, Yamanashi. In Yamanashi, we have a popular regional dish called Hoto. Hoto is udon noodles in miso soup with vegetables, such as pumpkin. I will serve Hoto-inspired handmade pasta hidden under pumpkin as a side dish.

Michelin star Chinese cuisine chef Kentaro Chen

2 Michelin Star Chef Kentaro Chen

Is it difficult to cook with Kenichi Chen, your father, side by side?

We cook together at our restaurant and for events frequently. I enjoy cooking with him and he is my mentor as well. However, I feel a bit nervous this time because I’m going to cook with three other legendary Iron Chefs. I feel very honoured and excited.

What made you follow in your father’s footsteps?

I grew up watching Iron Chef. My father was on the show but my favourite cuisine was French and I was a big fan of Mr. Sakai. I even learned French at uni. When I was 20 years old, I had an opportunity to see the special Iron Chef cook-off between Mr. Sakai and my father, live in a TV studio. I was moved by my father’s cooking and decided to become a Chinese cuisine chef.

The greatest title in the world of food is back! Watch as seven of the hottest rising star chefs face off on Iron Chef Gauntlet - Tuesdays, 7:30pm, on Food Network. Catch up on missed episodes at SBS On Demand.

命の出汁 – broth of vigour

an adventure in japanese cuisine, an obsession with the izakaya

Tagged with Michiba

dashi – the broth of vigour

Dashi is the basis of almost everything in Japanese cooking. This is a very strong statement which until recently I would have slightly chuckled at. Sure, the majority of basic cooking stocks build upon dash, but so do most sauces and even batters for Takoyaki (octopus balls) and Okonomyaki (Japanese Pancakes).

The recipe below is the standard I use as a basis for my dashi. I have seen a plethora of different variations using the same ingredients just tweaking the amounts, more on that later on. For a vegetarian stock I would substitute 50g of dried shitake mushrooms for the bonito flakes.

  • 1 Litre of water
  • a piece of konbu 3″ x 3″(dried kelp)
  • 30g katsuobushi (dried bonito shavings)

Put the water and the konbu in a saucepan and start up on a medium heat. Just prior to the water coming to the boil, pull out and discard the konbu and put in the katsuobushi, leaving until the water comes to the boil. When boiling begins turn off the heat and allow to cool for 10 to 15 minutes or until all the katsuobushi has sunk to the bottom of the pan. Then strain through a fine sieve or colander lined with muslin or paper towels.

From this base you can easily grab 200ml or so with a tablespoon of miso paste and your favourite garnishes (seaweed, long onions, tofu, etc) for a very delicious miso soup. It is so easy to throw together (even if you make the dashi from scratch) you will wonder why you used the packet mixes in the first place (except maybe to take to work!!). Another variation that is a favourite of mine is to add a handful of frozen seafood (from a marinara mix or similar) as the dashi is being brought to the boil for a more filling soup.

The finished dashi will keep for a few days in the fridge, or you can freeze it. I have some jumbo cubed ice cube trays which are great for this. You may want a more condensed dashi if you are going to freeze it (to take up less space in the freezer); my approach for this is to double the amount of konbu and katsuobushi and leave it to steep for longer. That way you can add an equal amount of water to the melted ice cube and get a similar flavoured soup.

Other regular uses in my kitchen include:

  • Cooking rice – replace the water you would use in your rice cooker with dashi
  • Vegetables – turnips, daikon raddish, cabbage , eggplants or other vegetables to be used as part of a japanese dish can be boiled in dashi to add extra flavour before the rest of the dish is added
  • Add to rice – one of my favourite lunches is to make some rice in a rice cooker, add some bits & pieces (long onions, any leftover or frozen seafood (defrosted of course) and other garnishes) and pour over hot dashi to make an almost porridge like consistency

Michiba’s Broth of Vigour

One of the key inspirations for this site, and hence the honour of the name comes from the original Iron Chef series (surprise). The first Iron Chef Japanese, Rokusaburo Michiba, had a trademark Dashi which was labelled “the broth of vigour” (in Japanese “Inochi no Dashi” or 命の出汁). He prepared this at the beginning of almost every battle, bringing water to the boil with Konbu in it then putting an absolute bucketload of katsuobushi into the pot.

This would make such an incredibly intense stock. I have overloaded my dashi a few times (no where near this extent) when I wanted to make a rich sauce base but I find you end up with a little too smoky a flavour for my liking using it this way just for a soup stock.

Anyway, dashi is easy and quick to put together from long life ingredients. Try it, you’ll never want to go back to the packet mix and it will never go to waste.

dashi – the broth of vigour

Dashi is the basis of almost everything in Japanese cooking. This is a very strong statement which until recently I would have slightly chuckled at. Sure, the majority of basic cooking stocks build upon dash, but so do most sauces and even batters for Takoyaki (octopus balls) and Okonomyaki (Japanese Pancakes).

The recipe below is the standard I use as a basis for my dashi. I have seen a plethora of different variations using the same ingredients just tweaking the amounts, more on that later on. For a vegetarian stock I would substitute 50g of dried shitake mushrooms for the bonito flakes.

  • 1 Litre of water
  • a piece of konbu 3″ x 3″(dried kelp)
  • 30g katsuobushi (dried bonito shavings)

Put the water and the konbu in a saucepan and start up on a medium heat. Just prior to the water coming to the boil, pull out and discard the konbu and put in the katsuobushi, leaving until the water comes to the boil. When boiling begins turn off the heat and allow to cool for 10 to 15 minutes or until all the katsuobushi has sunk to the bottom of the pan. Then strain through a fine sieve or colander lined with muslin or paper towels.

From this base you can easily grab 200ml or so with a tablespoon of miso paste and your favourite garnishes (seaweed, long onions, tofu, etc) for a very delicious miso soup. It is so easy to through together (even if you make the dashi from scratch) you will wonder why you used the packet mixes in the first place (except maybe to take to work!!). Another variation that is a favourite of mine is to add a handful of frozen seafood (from a marinara mix or similar) as the dashi is being brought to the boil for a more filling soup.

The finished dashi will keep for a few days in the fridge, or you can freeze it. I have some jumbo cubed ice cube trays which are great for this. You may want a more condensed dashi if you are going to freeze it (to take up less space in the freezer); my approach for this is to double the amount of konbu and katsuobushi and leave it to steep for longer. That way you can add an equal amount of water to the melted ice cube and get a similar flavoured soup.

Other regular uses in my kitchen include:

  • Cooking rice – replace the water you would use in your rice cooker with dashi
  • Vegetables – turnips, daikon raddish, cabbage , eggplants or other vegetables to be used as part of a japanese dish can be boiled in dashi to add extra flavour before the rest of the dish is added
  • Add to rice – one of my favourite lunches is to make some rice in a rice cooker, add some bits & pieces (long onions, any leftover or frozen seafood (defrosted of course) and other garnishes) and pour over hot dashi to make an almost porridge like consistency

Michiba’s Broth of Vigour

One of the key inspirations for this site, and hence the honour of the name comes from the original Iron Chef series (surprise). The first Iron Chef Japanese, Rokusaburo Michiba, had a trademark Dashi which was labelled “the broth of vigour” (in Japanese “Inochi no Dashi” or 命の出汁). He prepared this at the beginning of almost every battle, bringing water to the boil with Konbu in it then putting an absolute bucketload of katsuobushi into the pot.

This would make such an incredibly intense stock. I have overloaded my dashi a few times (no where near this extent) when I wanted to make a rich sauce base but I find you end up with a little too smoky a flavour for my liking using it this way just for a soup stock.

Anyway, dashi is easy and quick to put together from long life ingredients. Try it, you’ll never want to go back to the packet mix and it will never go to waste.

iron chef returns to japan

One of the biggest surprises out of my recent trip to Japan was seeing this billboard while walking down a side street in Shibuya.

Some intense googling on my return to where I was staying exposed the return of the Japanese version of Iron Chef. I was fortunate enough to see the double episode premiere while I was in Japan (most fortunate as my friend could tell me more of what was going on). Fans of the show outside of Japan can get them from this site, along with varying quality versions of the original series.

I have mixed feelings about the three episodes I have seen so far. It is wonderful to see the original format mostly retained; the overseas versions never really kept the theatrics and awe of the original version. Some of the new Iron Chefs will be familiar to fans as at least one has done battle in the old kitchen stadium. The new Chairman hasn’t inspired me yet, it is tough to match the impressive Chairman Kaga. The first problem with him I think is he has worn the same clothes in the first three episodes which seems to be like a uniform. Kaga would always wear something crazier each episode and I was convinced for many years that he had purchased the wardrobe from the Beatles “Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” Photo shoots. The new Chairman also is a little lacklustre on his introductions to the challengers and the ingredients for my liking.

Keeping a link to the original has been done very well, with Iron Chef Chen Kenichi presenting the “Nominees” (challengers) for the first two battles in the premiere. One of these was his son who gave it a good showing even though he lost the battle. Also, Iron Chef Rokusaburo Michiba (now 81 years old) appears in the second two episodes as a commentator, judge and taster. He has that kind of Sean Connery / Japanese James Bond look going, particularly with the light brown kimono, cravat and big glasses. The king of commentary, Dr Yukio Hattori returns as commentator also. Once again the poor man doesn’t seem to get the chance to taste the food.

These are not overdubbed into English, currently straight from Japan. Hopefully Food Network in the US will take it on board and do their magic as in the original series (cooking show treated like something from the wide world of sports, awesome). My Japanese is limited to hello, thank-you and food ingredients but I still find it very entertaining. It is amazing how, with many languages, much english has slipped into the vernacular.

You can keep tabs on what is happening on the Fuji TV Iron Chef Facebook Page and I will no doubt blog more on this revival as the series progresses.

Until next episode “Good Gastronomy!!” (OK, I think that Allez Cuisine was sexier too)

A week of miso soup, day 1: Zucchini miso soup

Continuing my series on Japanese home cooking, this week I would like to introduce different kinds of miso soup. Miso soup (misoshiru) is one of the key parts of a Japanese meal. Another kind of soup that is served often is a clear soup called osumashi, but the miso soup base is more adaptable to all kinds of variations.

The components of a miso soup are quite simple. It's based on a soup stock called dashi, with various ingredients cooked to different degrees in it. The miso is added at the very end of the cooking process.

I have gone over the making of dashi stock before (as well as the basics of miso soup), but it's always worthwhile going over it again - this time with pictures! I've given some vegetarian options for dashi also.

Today's miso soup is not quite traditional, but it's very easy to make with an ingredient that's easy to get practically anywhere. Besides, zucchini are very much in season right now, as anyone with a zucchini plant in their garden knows.

(If you haven't already, you may want to take a look at the essentials of a Japanese pantry, which has an explantion of the ingredients used.)

Traditional dashi stock

This is a basic and very delicious dashi stock, made with just two ingredients, pictured here.

The dark things are dried sheets of konbu seaweed that I have cut up with scissors for ease of use, and the stuff that looks like wood shavings is shaved dried bonito flakes. I store both double-bagged in plastic bags in the freezer.

Konbu is a large, thick leathery seaweed that is bursting with minerals. What makes it so ideal for making stock from is that it's packed with umami. Dried konbu will have a fine white powdery substance on the surface. Don't wash that off - that is full of umami! Some instructions may tell you to wipe off dirt from the konbu, but to be honest I haven't seen konbu with dirt on it for years, especially not on the dried, pre-packaged kind you are likely to find. If you taste it you will see that it is sort of like a much subtler version of MSG (monosodium glutamate) - not surprising, since MSG is actually chemically isolated umami.

Bonito is a kind of fish (called katsuo in Japanese); it's a popular sashimi item. A whole bonito fish side is slowly dried until it becomes a hard, woodlike block called katsuobushi. This is then shaved thinly. In my grandmother's time every household had a katsuobushi shaver, that sort of looked like a wood planer fixed on top of a box. My mother still prefers to shave her own, but I just use the pre-shaved kind that you see in the photo.

To make about 4 cups of dashi stock, you will need:

  • 4 cups of cold water
  • A 4 inch / 10 cm square piece (or small pieces adding up to that amount) of dried konbu
  • About 1 cup (a handful) of bonito flakes

Keep in mind these are not exact amounts. Adding more konbu or more bonito flakes will just give it more flavor. Fans of the original Iron Chef TV series may recall Iron Chef Japanese Rokusaburo Michiba (the one who preceeded Iron Chef Morimoto in that role) adding huge handfuls of bonito flakes to his dashi pots.

First, put your dried konbu and cold water into your pan, and leave it to soak for at least 20 minutes, preferably overnight. Don't wash off that white powder!

After the soaking time, bring the water up to a boil, throw in the bonito flakes, and turn off the heat. Leave to steep for a few minutes, then strain through a sieve.

Your dashi will be a pale golden yellow in color, and ready to use.

Note: if you are frugal, you can keep the used konbu and bonito flakes to make nibandashi from them - a thinner dashi that is fine for use in stewed dishes like nikujaga (Japanese meat and potatoes). Put in a plastic bag or container, and refrigerate for up to 3 days (or freeze) until ready to use.

Alternative ways of making non-vegetarian dashi

The easiest way is to just use dashi stock granules. I always have a box of this around since it's so handy. The amount to use depends on the brand, but generally it's about 1 teaspoon to 4 cups of water. Two brands that are widely available are Ajinomoto Hondashi and Shimaya Dashinomoto; to me they are virtually indistinguishable, though the Hondashi may have slightly more bonito aroma. Do keep in mind that dashi made from granules is saltier than dashi made from natural ingredients, so you will need to adjust the amount of miso soup you put in later. (See also health considerations - most dashi stock granule brands contain MSG.)

In some Japanese households, small dried fish called niboshi are used in stock instead of bonito flakes. You simply throw a few of them into the pot with the konbu, and let it simmer a bit. I have a bag of powdered niboshi, which can be used just like dashi granules. Some people object to dashi made from niboshi, considering it to be too fishy tasting. I don't mind it myself but I do prefer bonito flakes.

Vegetarian dashi

Use my basic vegetarian (vegan) dashi stock recipe. Alternatively, you can use vegetable stock cubes - the flavor won't be totally authentic, but will still add plenty of flavor.

What kind of miso to use

There are basically 2 kinds of miso widely available outside of Japan: white or yellow-brown, and red. For miso soup, I mostly use white miso (shiromiso) or awasemiso (blended miso). See the Japanese pantry list for more about miso.

Making miso soup

The key thing to remember when making miso soup is that the miso is always added last. Miso is quite heat-sensitive, and boiling it vigorously will really affect the flavor and texture adversely. Over-boiled miso soup takes on a rather grainy quality. The only things you can add after adding the miso are things that cook instantly, such as baby spinach leaves.

So, let's make a very simple miso soup.

Zucchini miso soup

  • 4 cups of dashi stock, prepared as above using your preferred method
  • 1 cup zucchini, cut into thin strips (about 1 small zucchini)
  • 1/4 to 1/3 cup white or blended miso (see notes)

Bring the dashi stock to a boil, and add the zucchini. Simmer until the zucchini is tender, about 5 minutes.

Put the miso into a small cup. Add a little of the hot dashi stock, and mix around with chopsticks or a fork until the miso is dissolved into a smooth paste. (The picture on top shows the miso before it's dissolved, and the one below shows it after.) Add to the soup. Taste the soup, and add a little more miso if it seems too weak for you. (I actually do this mixing with dashi part in the soup ladle, but a cup may be easier to handle if you aren't used to it.)

Bring the soup back up to heat, then switch off. Serve immediately.

  • If you are serving miso soup as part of a Japanese meal centered on white rice, make it a bit stronger in taste; if you are serving it as a separate course, hold back a bit on the amount of miso used. Always taste to make sure you have added the amount that's right for you.
  • Miso has a natural tendency to separate from the water/dashi, especially as it cools. If this happens to you, don't worry, just mix up the soup a bit.


2:37 pm Updated by

Fat Burning Soups For Weight Loss. A simple 3-step plan to lose weight fast, along with numerous effective weight loss tips. If only losing weight was as easy as gaining it, right? While there are plenty of advertised ways to shed some pounds, there are only a handful of methods that actually work.

Name:
Email*:
The message text*:

About

From low-carb diet, hi-protein diet, low fat diet and eating small meals 5-6 times a day diet, Fat Burning Soup Recipes is the only diet where I lost weight and most importantly kept it off!

Fat Burning Soups For Weight Loss

No massive shift in what you eat (you can still eat the same foods you do now).

No need to exercise or working out.

No silly dietary restrictions to follow.

No starving yourself and feeling miserable.

And just picture the envious glances you’d enjoy from the opposite sex and the astonishment of your friends because you’ve lost a total of 55 pounds.

Too good to be true?

That’s what Emily Sanders of Bristol in the UK though – until she actually achieved it.

Just look at her amazing transformation …

Get in Touch